Estelle Ishigo sketches and photographs 

Watercolor artist Estelle Peck Ishigo (1899-1990) was interned with her Japanese American husband Arthur Ishigo at Heart Mountain. After the Pearl Harbor attack, both she and her husband lost their jobs. Arthur was ordered to be interned and Estelle followed him although she was Caucasian and not forced to do so. Her papers contain photographs and sketches she created during her time at Heart Mountain. 

Additional content for this collection can be found in the "Inventory for Collection."

Estelle Peck and Arthur Ishigo, ca. 1928

Estelle married San Francisco Nisei Arthur Ishigo in 1928. They married in Mexico to avoid American anti-miscegenation laws.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_002
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Arthur Ishigo shoveling coal at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, ca. 1944

Arthur worked in a boiler room that provided hot water for a block of barracks.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_006
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.
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Estelle Ishigo at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, 1944

Estelle shown near a barracks building. 

Resource Identifier
ah10368_009
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.
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Estelle Ishigo outside her trailer home after release from Heart Mountain Relocation Center, ca. 1945

After the war and their release from internment, Arthur and Estelle lived in poverty for many years. Arthur died in 1957.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_017
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo of Heart Mountain Relocation Center internees braving a snowstorm, ca. 1944

Internees braved the elements to travel between buildings during their everyday life.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_023
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 2, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo of rationing coal for apartment stoves at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, ca. 1944

It took about four train car loads of coal a day to provide heat for internees during the cold winter months.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_045
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 2, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo of family life in Heart Mountain Relocation Center barracks apartment, ca. 1944

Families lived in apartments within tarpapered barracks. The largest apartments were simply single rooms measuring 24 feet by 20 feet.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_054
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 3, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo of men's washroom at Heart Mountain Relocation Center, ca. 1944

Men's and women's washrooms offered little if any privacy.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_061
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 3, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo of young male internees playing baseball, ca. 1944

Internees did what they could to make their situation liveable such as sports, clubs, and events.

Resource Identifier
ah10368_025
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 2, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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Sketch by Estelle Ishigo titled "We Are America, Again?"

Executive Order 9066 was rescinded in December 1944. Internees were released, often to resettlement facilities and temporary housing. Interned Japanese-Americans had not only lost their personal liberties, many also lost their homes, businesses, property, and savings. 

Resource Identifier
ah10368_107
Citation
Estelle Ishigo Photographs, Collection No. 10368, Box 1, Folder 4, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
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